Jeep JK Wrangler Coast Front 1310
Drive Shaft Installation Write-Up


In addition to things like taller coils, longer shocks and adjustable control arms and track bars, a new 1310 or 1350 double cardin U-Joint style front drive shaft is something that you really should have in your list of needed parts if you plan on lifting your Jeep JK Wrangler 3″ or more and you have an automatic transmission. While the factory front drive shaft isn’t all that bad, its diameter is very wide and at 3″ of lift or more, it will get hung up on the automatic transmission skid plate (limiting your droop) and its spline shaft boot will catch on the lip of your transmission sump pan causing it to tear.In addition to having a narrower diameter shaft, a good double cardin U-joint style drive shaft like the kind Coast makes will be stronger and a whole lot cheaper to service. In fact, 1310 or 1350 U-joints can be found just about anywhere at places like Napa and for dirt cheap. As far as what type of shaft you should get goes, I would have to say that unless you plan on running 37″ tires or bigger, a 1310 really is all that you need.The write-up below will show you just how easy it is to install a Coast 1310 front drive shaft, complete with replacement yokes on to your Jeep JK Wrangler.

What you will need


• 8,15,18mm Wrench & Socket
• 1/2″ Wrench
• 1-1/8,1-1/4″ Sockets
• Ratchet
• Ratchet Extension
• Ft. Lb. Torque Wrench
• Gear Puller
• Impact Wrench
• Cheater Bar
• Monkey Wrench
• Red Loctite 
   

Front Installation Instructions


NOTE: Before we get started, I need to clarify that this write-up is just a guide intended to help you install a 1310 front drive shaft on your Jeep JK Wrangler. Please be aware that there is actually a very specific method to replacing the pinion yoke on your front axle and it can be found in a Factory Service Manual. However, this method requires that you use a fine inch lb. torque wrench capable of being set to an inch. A torque wrench of this accuracy is not something you can pick up at your local parts or hardware store and if you can find one, it will be very expensive. Needless to say, I will not be focusing this write-up on that method but rather, show you what you can do with what you got.
This is a shot of everything you should get with your new Coast 1310 Jeep JK Wrangler front drive shaft. As you can see, you should have the shaft itself, pinion yoke, output shaft yoke and mounting hardware.
1. Park your Jeep JK Wrangler on level ground and with enough room to allow you to roll it forward or back a bit as needed. Engage your parking brake and then, using an 18mm socket, remove the bolt securing the transfer case and automatic transmission skid plates to the transmission cross member.
2. Using an 18mm socket, remove the bolt securing the transfer case and automatic transmission skid plates to the frame rails and gas tank skid plate on your Jeep JK Wrangler.
3. Using an 8mm socket, remove the 8 bolts securing your Jeep JK Wrangler’s factory front drive shaft to the output shaft flange on the transfer case. Accessing these bolts can be very difficult and you may find that you can only remove a couple at a time. As you remove the bolts you can, stop what you’re doing, put your transmission in neutral, release the parking brake and then roll your Jeep just a bit forward or back until you can access more of the bolts. Put your transmission back in park, re-engage your parking brake and then continue removing more bolts.
4. Using a 15mm socket and a ratchet extension, remove the 4 bolts securing your Jeep JK Wrangler’s factory front drive shaft to the pinion flange as shown. If you cannot access the upper bolts, roll your Jeep forward or back a bit like you did in step #3 as this will help. With the 4 bolts removed, the axle end of your Jeep JK Wrangler’s front drive shaft will pretty much fall off however, the transfer case end is seated inside a flange and may take a little effort to get it free. If needed, tap the sides of the drive shaft with a dead blow hammer as that will help.
5. With the factory front drive shaft off and out of the way, use a 1-1/8″ socket and a good impact wrench, remove the pinion nut as shown.NOTE: If you do not have an impact wrench, removing this nut will be very difficult even with a long breaker bar as you’ll have very little room to work with. The other problem you will have is that your Jeep will actually want to move with the turning of the nut. Having someone step on the brakes will help some as will someone holding a monkey wrench on the flange.
6. If the pinion flange is difficult to remove, using a gear puller like the one shown in this pic will help out a lot. 7. Install the new pinion yoke that came with your Coast 1310 front drive shaft onto the pinion of your Jeep JK Wrangler’s front axle. 8. Apply Red Loctite onto the threads of the factory pinion nut.
9. Using a 1-1/8″ socket and a torque wrench, install and tighten the pinion nut to 160 ft. lbs. of torque.
10. Shift your Jeep JK Wrangler’s transfer case into 4LO and then, using a 1-1/4″ socket and breaker bar, remove the output shaft flange nut as shown. 11. Using a gear puller, remove the output shaft flange from your Jeep JK Wrangler’s transfer case as shown. 12. Install the new output shaft yoke that came with your Coast 1310 front drive shaft onto the output shaft of your Jeep JK Wrangler’s transfer case.
13. Apply Red Loctite onto the threads of the factory output shaft nut. 14. Using a 1-1/4″ socket and a torque wrench, install and tighten the output shaft nut to 130 ft. lbs. of torque. 15. Apply Red Loctite to the threads of the provided 4 output shaft yoke nuts.
16. Install the double cardin end of your new Coast 1310 drive shaft onto the output shaft of your Jeep JK Wrangler’s transfer case and secure it in place with the 4 provided bolts. A 1/2″ wrench will be needed for this job. To reach all the bolts, simply shift your transfer case into neutral and that will allow you to rotate the drive shaft into position by hand. Once in place, shift the transfer case back into 4LO and that will hold everything in place so that you can tighten the bolts.
17. Apply Red Loctite to the threads of the 2 provided U-bolts. 18. Shift your Jeep JK Wrangler’s transfer case into neutral so that you can rotate your Coast 1310 drive shaft into position and install it onto your axle’s pinion yoke. Then, install the 2 U-bolts over the U-joint caps as shown. 19. Install the provided lock washers onto the ends of the U-bolts and then secure everything in place with provided nuts. A 1/2″ wrench will be needed for this job.
20. Shift your transfer case back into 2WD and you’re done.

And there you have it – You now have a brand new Coast 1310 front drive shaft installed on your Jeep JK Wrangler. Please let me know if you have any questions.
 

26 Comments

  1. hello i read the write-up and i would like to know do all jk’s need new driveshafts when you install a lift higher then 3.5″ or is for jk’s that have a automatic trans only and manual trans jk’s don’t need new shafts. because i would like to put a 4″ lift kit but i don’t want to have a surprise when im done and realize i have to get new shafts,

    Thank You Ray

  2. I have a 3″ TeraFlex lift and want to change my front driveshaft. I’m going to install upper and lower control arms to get the pinion angle set properly. Do you have a suggestion on what eye to eye settings I should start with for the upper and the lower control arms? Is there a caster angle I should shoot for or is pinion angle the primary objective?

    Thank you!
    Jim

  3. 6-8 degrees on the caster. oem is 4 degrees. You need front lower control arms and rear upper control arms @over 3″. I went with a cheaper lift and now i get to learn all about suspension geometry.

  4. If you have a 2.5″-3″ lift with a Automatic JK…Can you install this driveshaft without installing upper and lower control arms? I have no problem with the way my JK drives with the stock arms.

  5. No you dont have to get new control arms to install the shaft. longer front lower control arms actually puts a harsher angle on the shaft so your good with the factory arms with that much lift. thats how much lift i have too and adjustable front lower control arms make a HUGE difference.

  6. I installed a reel driveline front shaft and now I have drive line vibrations at about 8oks how do I fix this…they talk about ajustment to control arms but mine is still stock.

  7. so when you say “Please be aware that there is actually a very specific method to replacing the pinion yoke on your front axle and it can be found in a Factory Service Manual. However, this method requires that you use a fine inch lb. torque wrench capable of being set to an inch. A torque wrench of this accuracy is not something you can pick up at your local parts or hardware store and if you can find one, it will be very expensive. Needless to say, I will not be focusing this write-up on that method but rather, show you what you can do with what you got.”

    I guess the method is to just torque the shaft at the axle to 160 ft/lbs and then 130 ft/lbs at the transfer case? I’m guessing that is enough torque to get the job done but no so much to worry about crushing the crush sleeve?

    thanks,
    dan

  8. WOL,

    My Coast 1310 came with the yoke already bolted to the Transfer case end. Should I put that end on first and then slide the new yoke onto the axle end and insert the DS splines?

    Thanks

  9. What about the dust seals for the diff and the transfer case. Don’t you need them to stop the dust and mud from going into the seals?

  10. While replacing the yoke at the transfercase (front), I noticed a small diameter recess that I assumed would be for the rubber o ring taken from the original stock flange. I put the o ring in the recess and it had no interfearance with the nut that also had its own larger recess. Does this instal sound correct?

  11. My 2007 Jk Rubicon, Engine(3.8L), Automatic with 3.5″ Lift(from Currie Enterprises), Actual 4.0″ at front 3.0″ at rear.

    Can I change front drive shaft with Jereel 1350 ?

    Thanks for your advice.

    Let me know your contact number for further question.

    Maurice

  12. In the intro, you state … “you really should have in your list of needed parts if you plan on lifting your Jeep JK Wrangler 3″ or more and you have an automatic transmission”.

    Why do you qualify the “automatic transmission” in the statement? I have a ’13 JKUR that I recently lifted 3.5″. Will I not need this same enhancement?

    Jason

  13. 2007-11 JK’s with an automatic transmission will cause your factory front drive shaft to make contact on the side of it and on the skid plate. Both will cause damage to the slip boot. 2012-up JK with an automatic OR manual will both allow boot damage as it makes contact with the exhaust cross over IF you have too much droop.

  14. The torque value for the 1310 U-joint U-bolt (Spicer part #2-94-28X) is 14-17 lb ft. I cannot find a value for the 4 bolts, but I will just go with 20ish.

    FYI Coast changed ownership not too long ago; I had to call 3 different numbers before getting in touch with the people who sell/support the product.

    HTH

3 Trackbacks / Pingbacks

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  3. Should I use any sealant / lubricant or silicon material on pinyon yoke splines?

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