Full Traction Suspension Jeep JK Wrangler
3″ Ultimate Lift Installation Write-Up

Full Traction 3 in Ultimate Lift
Truly, there are few 3″ lift kits available on the market today for the Jeep JK Wrangler that are as complete and well made as the Full Traction Suspension 3″ Ultimate Lift. Made here in the USA, this lift kit comes with 3″ taller coils, adjustable lower and upper control arms, adjustable front and rear track bars, bump stop extensions, brake line relocation brackets, new longer sway bar links for the rear and sway bar link disconnects up front for X and Sahara model JK’s. In essence, you get EVERYTHING you need to dial in your ride as these components will allow you to reposition and center your axles under your Jeep, set your rear pinion angle (if you have an aftermarket drive shaft) and set your caster angle to where it needs to be after lifting your Jeep and installing bigger tires.Having personally tested the Full Traction 3″ Ultimate Lift, I can tell you that with the addition of the optional M-Force Monotube Gas Charged Shocks, this lift kit offers a ride that is in my opinion is better than stock on and off the pavement. On the rocks, I have found this lift kit to provide amazing articulation and the super beefy 2″ x .250″ wall DOM control arms take severe punishment with little more than a scratch to show for it.

Need I say, if you’re looking for a high quality and very complete 3″ suspension lift for your Jeep JK Wrangler, the Full Traction 3″ Ultimate Lift Kit is one that I would definitely recommend.

What You Will Need


Sockets & Wrenches
• 10,14,15,16,17,18,19,21mm
• 7/16,5/8,3/4Additional Tools
• 3/8″ & 1/2″ Drive Ratchets
• 3″ & 6″ Ratchet Drive Extension
• 12″ Ratchet Drive Extension
• Ft. Lb. Torque Wrench
• Breaker Bar
• Large Crescent Wrench
• Power Hand Drill
• 1/8″,11/32″,1/2″ Metal Drill Bit
• Sawzall or Reciprocating Saw
• Sawzall Metal Cutting Blade
• 21″ Floor Jack (2 if possible)
• (2) 6-Ton Jack Stands
• Wheel Chocks
• Angle Finder
• Hammer
• Center Punch
• Pry Bar
• Pliers
• Wire Snips
• Ruler or Tape Measure
• Safety Glasses
• Bench Vice

Additional Hardware
& Supplies Needed

(1) 1/2″x3″ Grade 8 Bolt
(1) 1/2″ Lock Nut
(1) 1/2″ Grade 8 Washer
• Anti-Seize Compound
• Grease Gun
• White Lithium Grease
• Zip Ties
• Pencil or Marker

 

What You Will Get


FTS7143 4-Dr 3.0″ Ultimate Suspension System (2) 50-7102 Front Coil Springs
(2) 50-7103 Rear Coil Springs

(2) 50-710206 Front Upper
Adjustable Control Arms
(2) 50-710204 Front Lower
Adjustable Control Arms
(2) 50-710207 Rear Upper Adjustable Control Arms
(2) 50-710205 Rear Lower Adjustable Control Arms

(1) 7112 Adjustable Front TracBar
(1) 7115 Adjustable Rear TracBar

(2) 50-7101 Rear Bump Stop Blocks
(2) CA1003 2”X3” Aluminum Bump Stop Ext.
(1) CA2007 Bracket, Rear Brake Line / Left
(1) CA2008 Bracket, Rear Brake Line / Right

70-7133 Master Hardware
(8) 90 Degree Zerk Fittings
(2) 1/4” x 3/4” Bolt
(2) 1/4” Metalock Nut
(2) 1/4” Flat Washer
(4) 3/8” x 3/4” Gr.8 Bolt
(4) 3/8” x Flat Washer
(4) 3/8” Metalock Nut
(2) 3/8” x 2.5” Self Tapping Bolt
(2) 12mmDia x 60mm Bolt
(2) 12mmDia x 65mm Bolt
(4) 12MM LockNut

70-7134 Front & Rear Trac Bar Hardware Kit
(2) KMX-12 3/4″ Chromoly Rod Ends
(4) 50-713315 Mis-Alignment Spacers
(4) CA1022 Black Vecton Trac Bar Bushings
(2) SLE 105 Trac Bar Sleeves
(2) 3/4″ Jam Nuts

70-7135 Bushing & Sleeve Kit
(12) MO2668 Lower Control Arm Bushings
(6) SLE10091 Control Arm Sleeves

70-7535 Control Arm Hardware Kit
(4) JM-16T 1″ x 1-1/4″-12 Male Rod Ends
(4) 1-1/4″ Jam Nuts

70-7539 High Mis-Alignment Spacer Kit
(8) 50-750608-04 High Mis-Alignment Spacers

FTS306071 JK NEW GEN. Front Sway Bar Link Kit (Assembled)
(2) 50-710301 JK Front Sway Bar Link Rods
(4) 50-5007 JK Disconnect Ends
(4) U0120677 Bail Pins
(4) MOO392-BK-01 5/8” Hourglass Bushings
(4) SLE104 1/2” x 1-3/8” Sleeves

70-4175 12” Straight Rear Sway Bar Link Kit (Assembled)
(2) 12” Straight Shank Rear Sway Bar Links
(4) SLE104 1/2” x 1-3/8” Sleeves
(4) MOO392-BK-01 5/8” Hourglass Bushing

 

Optional Equipment


Hydro Shock Absorbers
(2) Front Shocks 524515(658526)
(2) Rear Shocks 527005
(6) MOO392-BK-01 5/8 Hourglass Bushings
(2) BPJK Bar pin 3 1/2” Rear
(4) SLE104 ½ x 1-3/8” Sleeves
(2) 8172Bag1Stem Pack Lrg Dia
(4) MOO337-Black Shock Boots
(4) Zip Ties
(4) FTS DecalsM-Force Shock Absorbers
(2) FTS825097 Front Gas Shocks
(2) FTS835100 Rear Gas Shocks
(6) MOO392-BK-01 5/8 Hourglass Bushings
(2) BPJK Bar pin 3 1/2” Rear
(4) SLE104 ½” x 1-3/8” Sleeves
(2) 8172Bag1Stem Pack Lrg Dia
(4) MOO337-Black Shock Boots
(4) Zip Ties
(4) FTS Decals

FAQ


Q. Did you have any problems with wandering on the highway or with the ESP activating after you installed your Full Traction Suspension 3″ Ultimate Lift Kit?
A. No. Due to the design of this lift kit and it’s ability to completely dial in my suspension I did not have any problems what so ever with my ESP system or with wandering.Q. Did you have any problems with rubbing after installing 35″ tires?
A. Not really. The Full Traction 3″ Ultimate Lift Kit is a perfect fit for 35″ tires and with the exception of some minor rubbing at a full flex and at a full turn, I have had no real problems with it rubbing.

Q. Were you able to set your caster angle with this lift kit and if so, what did you set your caster angle to?
A. Yes, the Full Traction 3″ Ultimate Lift Kit comes complete with adjustable upper and lower front and rear control arms and I was able to set my caster to a +7°. At this setting, my Jeep JK Wrangler drives very straight and the steering wheel just about snaps back to center after making a turn.

Q. What shocks did you decide to run with this lift kit?
A. I have been running M-Force Shocks on my TJ for a couple of years now and feel they are some of the best shocks I have ever run. Need I say, I decided to run them on my Jeep JK Wrangler as well and I’m glad that I did.

Q. How long does it take to install this lift?
A. Depending on how much experience and help you have, the installation of this lift should take one whole day to do (6-8 hours).

Q. I have no experience working on Jeeps and was wondering if this is something you think I could do on my own, or should I have a shop do the install?
A. This is absolutely a mod that you can do on your own and I would highly recommend that you do. The experience you will gain is invaluable and you will learn a lot about your Jeep. Just make sure that you have all the right tools before you get started, follow these directions carefully and take your time.

 

Credits


This Full Traction Suspension Jeep JK Wrangler 3″ Ultimate write-up was photographed and writen by Cindy (wayoflifette) & Eddie (wayoflife) Oh.
   

Instructions


This is a pic of all the parts you should get with the Full Traction Suspension 3″ Ultimate Lift Kit. Take some time to make sure you have all the parts shown as well as all the tools listed on the left prior to starting this project.
Assembling the Full Traction Suspension
Track Bars and Upper and Lower Control Arms
1. Start by applying anti-seize to the threads of all Full Traction Suspension rod ends. 2. Using your finger, spread anti-seize on the Full Traction Suspension rod ends. 3. Install your Full Traction Suspension jam nuts onto all rod ends. Check for damaged threads and clean or file as needed to ensure a smooth rotation.
4. Install your Full Traction Suspension rod ends onto all the lower control arms. You do not need to set their fixed length at this time. 5. Apply white lithium grease to all the black Vecton bushings that come with the Full Traction Suspension Ultimate Lift Kit. 6. Insert the greased black Vecton bushings into each of the large eyelets on the opposite end of the Full Traction Suspension
upper and lower control arms as shown in this pic. A rubber mallet may be needed to tap them all the way in.
7. Apply white lithium grease to metal sleeves that’ll go inside the black Vecton bushings. 8. Insert metal sleeves into the black Vecton bushings on the Full Traction Suspension upper and lower control arms. Again, a rubber mallet may be needed to tap them all the way in. 9. Insert the Full Traction Suspension mis-alignment spacers into both sides of the lower control arm rod ends as shown in this pic.
10. Using a 3/8″ wrench, install the zerk grease fittings into the upper and lower control arms with the nipple end pointing towards the length of the arm. DO NOT tighten these fittings all the way down as it is not necessary and it will make adjustments to its position difficult once everything is installed.
11. With the control arms done, begin assembling your Full Traction adjustable front track bars by applying some white lithium grease to the 2 halves of the black Vecton bushings and then install them into the end of the track bar. If the fit is tight, use a rubber mallet to pound them in or a bench vice to compress them in.
12. Remove the protective plastic sheath cover off the chromoly rod ends and then apply some anti-seize compound onto the threads of it.
13. Install the jam nuts that are included in the hardware kit all the way on to the end of the rod end. 14. Install the rod end with jam nut all the way on to the Full Traction front and rear adjustable track bar arms until the jam nut makes contact with the track bar arm itself. 15. Apply a little white lithium grease to the track bar metal sleeve included in the hardware kit and insert it through the center of the black Vecton bushings.
16. If you find that the track bar metal sleeve is difficult to insert, use a bench vice to help compress it in as shown in this photo or use a rubber mallet to tap it all the way in.
17. Insert the 2 mis-alignment spacers into the rod ends of your Full Traction Suspension adjustable front and rear track bars.
 
Installing the Full Traction Suspension
3″ Ultimate Lift
1. Park your Jeep JK Wrangler on a level surface and chock your rear tires. Using an 18mm socket and wrench, remove the bolts and nuts securing your front sway bar links to the lower axle mounts. Then, slip a 19mm wrench inbetween the sway bar link and swaybar itself to secure the ball joint stud in place and remove the nut securing it in place with an 18mm wrench. Completely remove the links from the sway bar itself. (NOTE: If you have a manual transmission, skip to step #4).
2. If you have an automatic transmission, use an 18mm socket to remove the 3 bolts (one on each frame rail and one on the cross member) securing its skid plate to the frame of your Jeep JK Wrangler. Remove the skid plate and set it aside for now.
3. Remove the bolt securing your Jeep JK Wrangler’s front track bar to the front axle mount using a 21mm socket. This can be a tough bolt to remove and an impact wrench or breaker bar will help to make this job easier.
4. Using a 21mm socket and wrench (or crescent wrench), remove the bolt and nut securing the factory front track bar onto the frame mount of your Jeep JK Wrangler. Again, this can be a tough bolt to remove and an impact wrench or breaker bar will help to make this job easier.
5. Loosen (but do not remove) the lug nuts on your front wheels, raise the front end of your Jeep JK Wrangler one side at a time from the axle using a tall floor jack and then set it back down onto (2) jack stands, each placed just behind the lower control arm frame mounts as shown in this pic.
6. Remove the wheels off your Jeep JK Wrangler using a 19mm lug wrench or socket and then place them under the frame rails for added security. Leave the floor jack under the front axle to help support it. 7. Using a 5/8″ wrench, hold your Jeep JK Wrangler’s front shock can in place just below the upper shock mount to keep it from spinning. Then, remove the stud mount nut above using a 16mm wrench. 8. Using an 18mm socket and wrench, remove the bolt and nut securing your Jeep JK Wrangler’s front shock to the lower axle mount. Pull out the entire shock assembly and set aside the factory rubber bushings and washers as they will be reused.
9. Being mindful of your brake lines, carefully lower your Jeep JK Wrangler’s front axle until the factory front coils can be slipped out of the upper perch and be removed completely with ease. 10. Using a 21mm socket and wrench, remove the bolts securing your factory front lower control arms to your Jeep JK Wrangler’s front axle mounts. These bolts will be tough to remove and the use of a breaker bar may be needed. 11. Again, using a 21mm socket and wrench, remove the bolts securing your Jeep JK Wrangler’s factory front lower control arms to the frame rail mounts and then completely remove it from your Jeep. Be sure to save the factory hardware as they will be reused.
12. Your Jeep JK Wrangler’s factory front lower control arms measure 22-5/8″ in lenght center to center. As a starting point, I set my new Full Traction adjustable front lower control arms to being 23″ long which is 3/8″ longer than stock.
13. Install your Full Traction Suspension adjustable lower front control arms onto the frame mounts using the factory hardware. Do not torque this bolt yet as it will need to be done once your Jeep JK Wrangler is back on the ground.
14. Install your Full Traction Suspension adjustable lower front control arms onto the axle mounts using the factory hardware. Again, do not torque this bolt yet as it will need to be done once your Jeep JK Wrangler is back on the ground. 15. Using a pair of needle nose pliers, pry off the wiring harness from your Jeep JK Wrangler’s drivers side upper control arm axle mount bracket as shown in this pic. 16. Remove the bolts securing your Jeep JK Wrangler’s factory front upper control arms from the axle mounts using a 18mm socket and wrench. Be sure to save the factory hardware as they will be reused.
17. Using a 18mm wrench, remove the bolt securing the driver side upper control arm to the frame mount of your Jeep JK Wrangler and remove the control arm itself. Then, loosen the passenger side upper control arm frame mount bolt as shown in this pic. 18. As you can see in this pic, the passenger side upper control arm frame mount bolt cannot be extracted due to your Jeep JK Wrangler’s exhaust being in the way. For the purposes of this write-up, I recommend that you just cut it and replace it with a new bolt. 19. Pull the head of the passenger side upper control arm frame mount bolt out as far as you can and then cut it off using a Sawzall reciprocating saw and metal cutting blade as shown in this pic. Once cut, extract the remaining length of the bolt and remove the control arm itself from your Jeep JK Wrangler.
20. Your Jeep JK Wrangler’s factory front upper control arms measure 18-3/4″ in lenght center to center. Again, as a starting point, I set my Full Traction front adjustable upper control arms to 18-7/8″ long which is 1/8″ longer than stock.
21. Using a 3/4″ socket attached to a ratchet extension carefully feed your new 1/2″x3″ Grade 8 replacement bolt into the access hole on the outside of the frame rail and install the Full Traction Suspension adjustable upper control arm onto your Jeep JK Wrangler’s passenger side frame mount as shown in this pic.
22. Using a 3/4″ socket and wrench, secure the Full Traction Suspension upper control arm frame mount bolt in place using your new replacement washer and lock nut. Tighten but do not torque this bolt and nut at this time. 23. Install your Full Traction Suspension driver side adjustable upper control arm onto the frame mount on your Jeep JK Wrangler using the factory hardware. An 18mm socket will be needed for this job. Tighten but do not torque this bolt at this time. 24. Install both Full Traction Suspension adjustable upper control arms onto the axle mounts using the factory hardware. Make sure that the bolts are installed from the inboard to outside and then finger tighten but do not torque these bolts at this time.
25. Zip-tie the wiring harness you previously cut off of the factory driver side upper control arm to the new Full Traction Suspension unit as shown in this pics.
26. Clean off the lower spring perch on your Jeep JK Wrangler’s front axle and then, using one of the Full Traction Suspension aluminum bump stop extensions as a template, mark the center hole using a pencil or marker. 27. Set aside the Full Traction Suspension aluminum bump stop extension and then mark the point where you will need to drill your mounting hole on the lower spring perch using a center punch and hammer. 28. Use a 1/8″ metal drilling bit to make a pilot hole in the center of your Jeep JK Wrangler’s front lower spring perches. Then, drill the pilot holes you just made to their final size using an 11/32″ metal drilling bit.
29. Using a 9/16″ socket and one of the 3/8″x2-1/2″ self-tapping bolts provided with the Full Traction kit, slowly thread the holes you just drilled out by pressing down and ratcheting the bolt on. Make sure to back out often to clear out the debris and take your time. 30. Make sure your Jeep JK Wrangler’s coil isolator is still seated on the factory bumpstop tower. Then, take one of your new Full Traction Suspension front coils, slip it up over the factory bump stop and then before seating it onto the lower spring perch, slip in one of the aluminum bump stop extension through the bottom of the coil as shown in this pic. 31. Insert the 3/8″x2-1/2″ self-tapping bolt through the middle of the Full Traction Suspension aluminum bump stop extension and secure it in place using a 9/16″ socket and a 3″ ratchet extension. Working through the coils as shown in this pic, tighten the bolt to 30 ft. lbs. of torque.
32. Depending on what shocks you decided to get with your Full Traction 3″ Ultimate Lift Kit, you may find that bar pins will have been pre-installed into the lower shock bushing. If this is the case with your shocks, you will need to remove them and replace them with the metal sleeves that will be included with the shock hardware. A bench vice will help out a lot to press out the existing bar pin enough for you to pry it out and it will help you to press in the new metal sleeves.
33. Re-using the factory hardware, assemble one of the large flat washers onto your front shock mounting stud and then follow it up with the rubber bushing that has a raised center lip as shown in this pic. 34. Slip the front shock mounting stud up into your Jeep JK Wrangler’s upper mount, slide on the opposite rubber bushing so that it mates perfectly over the raised lip of the lower bushing and then cap it off with the other large flat washer. 35. Secure the front shock mounting stud in place with the new nut and jam nut that should be included with shocks. You will need either (2) 17mm wrenches to do this or an 11/16″ will make a good substitute. Tighten this nut to 17 ft. lbs. of torque.
36. Using an 18mm socket and wrench, secure your front shocks to your Jeep JK Wrangler’s axle mount using the factory hardware and tighten the nut and bolt to 56 ft. lbs. of torque.
37. Now that we have raised our Jeep JK Wrangler 3″ in the front, the axle will have shifted and will need to be shifted back over towards the passenger side by about 3/8″ in order to re-center it. So, unscrew the rod end on the Full Traction adjustable front track bar back out until the gap between the jam nut and the edge of the track bar arm measures 3/8″. Once the adjustment you need to make has been made, make sure that the mounting hole in the rod end is facing the same direction as the Vecton bushing end and then secure the rod end in place by tightening the jam nut against the track bar arm finger tight.
38. Install the Vecton Bushing end of your new Full Traction adjustable front track bar onto the frame mount of your Jeep JK Wrangler making sure that the bend in it is facing the appropriate direction and clears the differential. Then secure it in place using the factory hardware.
39. Reinstall your Jeep JK Wrangler’s front wheels, lower it back down on the ground and tighten the lug nuts to 95 ft. lbs. of torque.
40. Use a crescent wrench to secure the rod end jam nut in place and make sure that you still have both misalignment spacers in place. With the engine off, put your key in the ignition, make sure that the steering wheel is unlocked and then have a friend turn it in one direction or the other until you can line up your new Full Traction adjustable front track bar rod end with the axle mount hole on your Jeep JK Wrangler. Secure the rod end in place using the factory hardware.
41. Using a 21mm socket, tighten your new Full Traction adjustable front track bar to the axle mount of your Jeep JK Wrangler to 125 ft. lbs. of torque.
42. Again, use a 21mm socket and wrench to tighten your new Full Traction adjustable front track bar to the frame mount of your Jeep JK Wrangler to 125 ft. lbs. of torque.
43. If you have a Sahara or X model Jeep JK Wrangler, install the new Full Traction Suspension sway bar link disconnects onto the sway bar itself using the hardware provided and the front axle mounts using the factory hardware. Tighten them to 75 ft. lbs. of torque. You will need an 18mm socket and wrench to do this job. If you have a Rubicon model JK, you will need to install the factory rear sway bar links after they have been removed.
44. Using a large crescent wrench, tighten all your Full Traction Suspension adjustable lower and upper control arm jam nuts. Keep an eye on the lower control arm rod ends as you will want them sitting parallel to the mounting brackets and they will have a tendency to rotate over as you are doing this. If they do, use a pry bar and place it between the rod end and one side of the axle mounting bracket to help you keep them in place as you tighten the jam nut.
45. If you have an automatic and removed your skid plate earlier, use an 18mm socket to re-install and secure it to the frame of your Jeep JK Wrangler using the 3 factory bolts.
46. Remove the wheel chocks from the rear and place them up front. Loosen but do not remove the lug nuts on the rear wheels. Then, lift the rear end of your Jeep JK Wrangler from the differential using a tall floor jack and then set it back down onto (2) jack stands, each placed just behind the lower control arm frame mounts. Remove the wheels using a 19mm lug wrench or socket and set them under the frame rails for added protection. Leave the floor jack under front the axle to help support it.
47. Using a 16mm socket and a 6″-12″ ratchet drive extension, remove your Jeep JK Wrangler’s 2 upper rear shock mount bolts. 48. Using an 18mm socket and wrench, remove the bolt and nut securing your Jeep JK Wrangler’s rear shocks to the lower axle mounts. Remove and set aside your shocks for now. 49. Using an 18mm socket and wrench, remove the bolt and nut securing your Jeep JK Wrangler’s rear sway bar links to the lower axle mounts. Using a 19mm and 18mm wrench, completely remove the links from the sway bar itself.
50. Remove the rear track bar bolt and nut from your Jeep JK Wrangler’s lower axle mount using a 21mm socket. As was the case with the front track bar, this can be a tough bolt to remove and a breaker bar will help to make this job easier.
51. Using a 10mm deep well socket and extension, remove the 2 nuts securing your Jeep JK Wrangler’s emergency brake cables to the bottom of the tub. This is necessary in order for you to get your rear axle to droop enough to install your new coils. 52. Using a 10mm socket, unbolt the rear brake line brackets which are fastened to the outside frame rails of your Jeep JK Wrangler. Leave them dangling at this time. 53. Slowly lower your Jeep JK Wrangler’s rear axle being mindful of the ESP wiring. Once your axle is dropped low enough, your factory coils should just about fall out and can be removed with ease. Set aside the upper rubber isolators as they will be reused.
54. Remove your Jeep JK Wrangler factory rear lower control arms from the frame rail mounts using a 21mm socket. These bolts will be tough to remove and the use of a breaker bar may be needed. Also, be sure to keep your hardware as they will be reused.
55. Remove your Jeep JK Wrangler factory rear lower control arms from the axle mounts using a 21mm socket and wrench. As before, these bolts will be tough to remove and a breaker bar may be needed. Again, be sure to save the factory hardware as they will be reused.
56. Your Jeep JK Wrangler’s factory rear lower control arms measure 19-5/8″ in lenght center to center. As a starting point, I set my new Full Traction adjustable rear lower control arms to being 19-3/4″ long which is 1/8″ longer than stock.
57.Your Jeep JK Wrangler’s factory rear upper control arms measure 17-11/16″ in lenght center to center. As a starting point, I set my new Full Traction adjustable rear upper control arms to being 17-13/16″ long which is 1/8″ longer than stock.
58. Install your Full Traction Suspension adjustable rear lower control arms onto the frame mounts using the factory hardware. Finger tighten the bolts for now. 59. Install your Full Traction Suspension adjustable rear lower control arms onto the axle mounts using the factory hardware. Finger tighten the bolts for now. 60. Position a 2nd floor jack or your Jeep JK Wrangler’s scissor jack under the rear pinion to help support it. This will prevent the axle from rolling forward when removing the rear upper control arms.
61. Remove your factory rear upper control arms from the frame rail mounts using a 21mm socket. As before, these bolts will be tough to remove and a breaker bar may be needed. Be sure to save the factory hardware as they will be reused.
62. Remove your factory rear upper control arms from the axle mounts using a 21mm socket. Again, these bolts may require the use of a breaker bar in order to free it up. Be sure to save the factory hardware as they will be reused. (If you have a 4-door model Jeep JK Wrangler Unlimited, skip to step #66).
63. If you have a 2-door model Jeep JK Wrangler, your rear drive shaft will be at a steep enough angle that it can cause premature wear of your CV joint boots. Before installing your Full Traction Suspension rear upper control arms, I would recommend that you set the pinion up so that it’s parallel (or close to it as possible) with the drive shaft. Using the floor jack you have already positioned under the pinion and an angle finder, raise the pinion up until the degree angle on the pinion is the same as the angle reading on the drive shaft.
64. Using the factory bolts and flagged nuts, install the Full Traction Suspension upper control arms onto the frame mount mounts and finger tighten bolts for now. Getting the bolt to line up with the flagged nut can be quite a challenge but if you go slow and take your time, it can be done.
65. Using the factory bolts and flagged nuts, install Full Traction Suspension upper control arms onto axle mounts and finger tighten bolts for now. If have a 2-door model Jeep JK Wrangler and made adjustments to your pinion angle, you will need to adjust your rear upper control arms to the appropriate length prior to installing them onto your axle mounts.
66. Take your new Full Traction Suspension rear coil, hold it so that the tapered end is pointing down and then place the factory rubber isolator on top of it as shown in this pic. 67. Install your new Full Traction Suspension rear coils on the rear of your Jeep JK Wrangler making sure that the isolators and coils are properly seated in their perches. 68. Place the Full Traction Suspension Rear Bump Stop Blocks on top of your Jeep JK Wrangler’s rear axle bump pads and secure them in place using the 3/8″x3/4″ bolts, washers and nuts provided with the kit. You will need (2) 9/16″ wrenches for the job but a 14mm wrench will act as a good substitute
69.Using a 10mm socket and the factory hardware, install the Full Traction Suspension Brake Line Extension Brackets, onto your Jeep JK Wrangler’s frame rails. 70. Secure your Jeep JK Wrangler’s rear brake lines to the new extension brackets using the 1/4″x3/4″ bolts, washers and lock nuts provided with the kit. You will need a 7/16″ socket and wrench for this job. 71. Using an 18mm socket and 19mm wrench install your new Full Traction Suspension 12” Straight Rear Sway Bar Links onto your factory Jeep JK Wrangler sway bar using the 12×60mm bolts and nuts provided with the kit.
72. Using an 18mm socket and wrench, secure your new Full Traction Suspension 12” Straight Rear Sway Bar Links to your Jeep JK Wrangler’s lower axle mounts using the factory hardware. 73. Make sure your new rear shocks have the appropriate bar pin installed. Then, using a 16mm socket and a 12″ ratchet extension, install them onto the rear upper shock mounts on your Jeep JK Wrangler using the factory hardware. Tighten these bolts to 37 ft. lbs. of torque. 74. Using an 18mm socket and wrench, install your new rear shocks onto your Jeep JK Wrangler’s lower axle mounts using the factory hardware. Tighten these bolts to 56 ft. lbs. of torque.
75. Just as was the case up front, Jeep JK Wrangler’s rear axle will need to be shifted over towards the driver side by about 3/8″ in order to get it re-centered. So, unscrew the rod end on the Full Traction adjustable rear track bar back out until the gap between the jam nut and the edge of the track bar arm measures3/8″. Once the adjustment you need to make has been made, make sure that the mounting hole in the rod end is facing the same direction as the Vecton bushing end and then secure the rod end in place by tightening the jam nut against the track bar arm finger tight.
76. Install the Vecton bushing end of your new Full Traction adjustable rear track bar onto the frame mount of your Jeep JK Wrangler making sure that the bend in it is facing the appropriate direction and clears the differential. Secure the track bar in place using the factory hardware and making sure that you reverse the bolt so that the threads are pointing towards the rear of your Jeep. If you don’t do this, your bolt may come into contact with the bump stop extension. Tighten this bolt to 125 ft. lbs. of torque.
77. Reinstall your Jeep JK Wrangler’s rear wheels, lower it back down on the ground and then tighten the lug nuts to 95 ft. lbs. of torque.
example pic 78. More than likely you new Full Traction Suspension adjustable rear track bar rod end will not line up exactly with the axle mount hole on your Jeep JK Wrangler and you may find it necessary to have a friend push on the side of your Jeep a bit in order to get things to line up. Or, if you’re doing this on your own, you can use a ratchet strap as is shown in the example pic to the left (from the TeraFlex Budget Boost Write-Up) to do the same thing. Once everything is lined up and making sure that you have your misalignment spacers installed, secure the rod end in place using the factory hardware. Using a 21mm socket, tighten this bolt to 125 ft. lbs. of torque.
79. Use a crescent wrench to secure the rod end jam nut in place up against the Full Traction Suspension adjustable rear track bar itself as shown in this pic.
80. Using a 10mm socket, re-secure your Jeep JK Wrangler’s emergency brake cables hanger to the bottom of the tub using the factory nuts.
81. Using a large crescent wrench, tighten all your Full Traction Suspension adjustable lower and upper control arm jam nuts. Keep an eye on the lower control arm rod ends as you will want them sitting parallel to the mounting brackets and they will have a tendency to rotate over as you are doing this. If they do, use a pry bar and place it between the rod end and one side of the axle mounting bracket to help you keep them in place as you tighten the jam nut.
82. Using a 21mm socket, go around and tighten all the Full Traction Suspension adjustable lower control arm bolts, both at the axle and the frame mounts of your Jeep JK Wrangler, to 125 ft. lbs. of torque.
83. Using a 21mm socket, tighten the Full Traction Suspension rear adjustable upper control arm bolts, both at the frame and axle mounts of your Jeep JK Wrangler to 125 ft. lbs. of torque.
84. Using an 18mm socket tighten up your driver side Full Traction Suspension front adjustable upper control arm frame mount bolts to 75 ft. lbs. of torque. 85. Using an 3/4″ socket, wrench and wrench extension, tighten up your Full Traction Suspension passenger side front adjustable upper control arm frame mount bolts to 75 ft. lbs. of torque. 86. Using an 18mm socket and wrench, tighten up your Full Traction Suspension front upper control arm axle mount bolts to 75 ft. lbs. of torque.
87. Use a grease gun and lube up all the zerk grease points on your new Full Traction Suspension control arms. Some of the zerk grease points may be difficult to reach and I would recommend replacing the rigid barrel of your gun with a hose attachment as as shown in this pic it will help you out a lot. Also, you may find it necessary to adjust the position of the zerk nipples a bit to allow for better access and a 3/8″ wrench will be needed to do this.
88. Because of the lift, your steering wheel will be off center a bit. To re-center your steering wheel, use a 15mm wrench to loosen the 2 nuts on the turnbuckle as shown in the pic to the left. Then, rotate the turnbuckle clockwise or counter clockwise as needed while a friend watches the steering wheel (or you periodically check on it yourself) go back to center. Once re-centered, secure the nuts and take it for a drive to check your steering wheel. This may take a few tries to get it on 100% but that’s all there is to it.
89. Place an angle finder on the flat base of your front axle as shown in this pic and determine what your caster angle is. From the factory, your caster angle is a +4.2°. For 3″ of lift and 35″-37″ tires, I would recommend that you set your caster angle at about +7°-8°. And, if you set your front upper and lower control arms to the specs I have provided, your caster angle should be about there now.

And that should be it! You’re Jeep JK Wrangler is now sitting on top of a Full Traction 3″ Ultimate Lift. Double check to make sure you have tightened every bolt to torque specs and then take your Jeep out for a test drive. With the exception of re-centering your steering wheel and setting your caster angle, no further alignment adjustments should be needed as the only thing left would be your toe-in adjustment and this will not have changed due to the new steering design of the JK.
If everything checks out, take your rig out and get it dirty! And, if more adjustments are needed, click on the link below for information on how to do basic front end alignment:Basic do it Yourself Front End Alignment

If you have any questions, please don’t hesitate to give us a holler.

Additional Photos


Before
After - On the Trails
To see more photos of the Project-JK Jeep with the Full Traction Suspension 3″ Ultimate Lift installed, click on the links below:

 

 

110 Comments so far

  1. jsmoriss August 5th, 2007 9:15 pm

    WoL,

    Thanks for th great write-up!

    Some people, like myself, will be using this lift with 33″ tires. What do you suggest as a starting point for caster angle? Will the bump stop extensions limit the flex prematurely for 33″ tires? Are there thinner bump stop extensions available for ’smaller’ diameter tires?

    BTW, your write-up is just in time! I should be installing this lift in 2-3 weeks (just waiting for it to ship from Quadratec).

    Thanks!
    js.

  2. Red7 August 5th, 2007 9:47 pm

    Thanks so much for this write up! I’ve never installed a lift before but after reading this I’m not at all worried. This lift is sitting in my garage and my ‘08 4dr Sahara is supposed to be here August 14th.

    My only question (at least until I get started) is if you know of any changes to the ‘08 that would throw off the measurements and angles you gave us? Also, is your experience that the tolerances off the assembly are close enough that your measurements should work for all installs or is each Jeep different? If not, any suggestions on what to look for to make sure my vehicle is properly adjusted?

    Thanks again!

  3. Red7 August 5th, 2007 11:15 pm

    Also, I just went through all of the parts to make sure everything is there and I’m thrown off by something. Both the FT instructions and your write up mention 12 lower control arm bushings but I only have 8. Are they counting the 4 track bar bushings as well? I’m assuming they are. I’m going to go ahead and put everything together tonight to see what I’m missing and to have everything ready to throw on when my jeep arrives.

    BTW-this kit is so beefy and I’m extremely impressed with the finish on all of the parts. I’m so glad I settled on this kit!!!

  4. Red7 August 6th, 2007 12:53 am

    Sorry to keep posting-and hopefully this will help rather than confuse people-but I figured out why I was confused on the number of control arm bushings in my kit. The photo that came with my kit and the photo you show of all of the parts in the FT Ultimate kit show the REAR LOWER CONTROL ARM with the rubber bushings and this lines up with the photos you show during your installation. However, the 2 lower rear control arms in my kit come with a metal (pre-assembled) fitting which looks very similar to the non-rubber bushing side of the REAR UPPER CONTROL ARM as seen in the photo next to step 64 or your write up. FT still sent me 6 control arm sleeves for the “12 bushings” they show in the photo but I have 2 left over since my kit only came with 8 bushings.

    I don’t know if my kit is a newer version or if yours is but I just wanted to share this info in case anyone else gets their kit and thinks that FT didn’t send enough rubber bushings. I have assembled all of the pieces but obviously haven’t installed anything on my Jeep so it’s possible that I’m mistaken but it appears that FT did make a change to the REAR LOWER CONTROL ARM. If this is more confusing than helpful feel free to delete this (or any of mine) post.

    BTW-your instructions are SOOOOOOO much better than the FT ones and they would be smart to print yours out and provide that to their customers (for a small fee of course)!

  5. wayoflife August 6th, 2007 10:59 am

    Hey js,

    Some people, like myself, will be using this lift with 33″ tires. What do you suggest as a starting point for caster angle?

    In my opinion, the factory +4.2° caster setting is a bit shallow and it caused my JK to wander on the highway right off the lot. Needless to say, I would recommend that you set your caster to at least +5°~6° for 33’s. If you set your front lower control arm lenghts a bit shorter than what had but leave the uppers the same, you should be able to get what you want. :)

    Will the bump stop extensions limit the flex prematurely for 33″ tires? Are there thinner bump stop extensions available for ’smaller’ diameter tires?

    Trust me, no, they won’t and you really don’t want a shorter one.  In addition to preventing rubbing at a full flex, bumpstop extensions exist to help prevent the over compression of your coils - something you want.  

    Eddie

  6. wayoflife August 6th, 2007 11:11 am

    Hey Red7,

    My only question (at least until I get started) is if you know of any changes to the ‘08 that would throw off the measurements and angles you gave us?

    No, there are none that I know of and can’t imagine that there would be any.

    Also, is your experience that the tolerances off the assembly are close enough that your measurements should work for all installs or is each Jeep different? If not, any suggestions on what to look for to make sure my vehicle is properly adjusted?

    Well, in my experience working on Jeeps of all types, no two are exactly alike for sure but for your purposes, I think the tolerances are close enough that my measurements should work just fine. As far as what to look for if they aren’t goes, your rear track bar rubbing on the passenger side rear coil would mean your rear axle is pushed too far. Up front, if your caster setting isn’t where you’d like to have it, that would be a clear sign that something was off there as well. :)

    Eddie

  7. wayoflife August 6th, 2007 11:17 am

    Hey Red7 again ;)

    Both the FT instructions and your write up mention 12 lower control arm bushings but I only have 8. Are they counting the 4 track bar bushings as well? I’m assuming they are.

    Yes, 8 are for the lower control arm frame mounts and the other 4 smaller ones should be for the front and rear track bar frame mounts.

    BTW-this kit is so beefy and I’m extremely impressed with the finish on all of the parts. I’m so glad I settled on this kit!!!

    LOL!!! I have owned and installed many lifts from many different manufacturers and can tell you that in my opinion, the design, finish, quality of construction and extremely impressive welds of Full Traction kits are by far some of the best around if not the best.

    Eddie

  8. wayoflife August 6th, 2007 11:24 am

    And yet again, hey Red7 ;)

    Sorry to keep posting-and hopefully this will help rather than confuse people-but I figured out why I was confused on the number of control arm bushings in my kit.

    LOL!! No need to apologize and yes, questions like yours always help out everyone in the end :)

    The photo that came with my kit and the photo you show of all of the parts in the FT Ultimate kit show the REAR LOWER CONTROL ARM with the rubber bushings and this lines up with the photos you show during your installation. However, the 2 lower rear control arms in my kit come with a metal (pre-assembled) fitting which looks very similar to the non-rubber bushing side of the REAR UPPER CONTROL ARM as seen in the photo next to step 64 or your write up.

    Well, to be quite honest, I got my photo from Full Traction’s website and looking at it again now, I can tell you that a few of the parts shown in it are incorrect including what the front swaybar disconnect links look like. I will try to get an updated photo and replace it as soon as I can.

    FT still sent me 6 control arm sleeves for the “12 bushings” they show in the photo but I have 2 left over since my kit only came with 8 bushings.

    Hmmm, all I can say is that it just must have been an oversight on their behalf or just extra parts tossed in the kit by mistake.

    I don’t know if my kit is a newer version or if yours is but I just wanted to share this info in case anyone else gets their kit and thinks that FT didn’t send enough rubber bushings. I have assembled all of the pieces but obviously haven’t installed anything on my Jeep so it’s possible that I’m mistaken but it appears that FT did make a change to the REAR LOWER CONTROL ARM. If this is more confusing than helpful feel free to delete this (or any of mine) post.

    As mentioned above, the photo and parts list were right off of Full Traction’s website but if you follow my instructions, I think you will see that you have everything you need.

    BTW-your instructions are SOOOOOOO much better than the FT ones and they would be smart to print yours out and provide that to their customers (for a small fee of course)!

    Thanks, I really do appreciate the compliment :)
    Eddie

  9. John August 6th, 2007 3:29 pm

    Great write up. How much lift did you gain total with your 35 tires? What kind of ground clearances?

  10. wayoflife August 6th, 2007 3:42 pm

    Hey John, I had gained about 3″ exactly but that’s with my big heavy PUREJEEP front bumper with WARN PowerPlant winch, PUREJEEP rear bumper tire carrier. Without them, I’m sure I would be sitting about 1/2″ taller. If you want, I can take an exact measurement but you’ll have to let me know where you want me to take it so that we’d be comparing apples to apples.

    Eddie

  11. John August 7th, 2007 4:47 pm

    Thanks for your response! Couple more questions, would a base ‘X’ have more gain than and unlimited Rubi? How long have you been running this lift, were you running it during your Slick Rock and Deer Valley run? Which are amazing photos by the way! One more question and Ill leave you alone…where can I get that bad ass Full Traction Decal for my windshield? You have mean lookin’ Jeep!

  12. wayoflife August 7th, 2007 6:55 pm

    LOL!! You don’t have to leave me alone and it really is my pleasure to help out in anyway that I can. Regarding your questions, what I can tell you is that a base X phyiscally sits about 1/2″ shorter than a Rubicon so the amount of lift you will see would be slightly more, technically, but ultimately the same side to side. As far as how long I have been running this lift goes, since just before Moab Easter Jeep Safari. Need I say, all the pics in the photo gallery from about April on are with this lift, Slick Rock and Deer Valley included. Last but not least, if you get this kit, let me know and I will try to have someone over at Full Traction send you one. :)

    Eddie

  13. John August 8th, 2007 9:22 am

    That would be awesome! Thanks for the response!

    -John

  14. Michigan Mike August 9th, 2007 8:42 am

    I’m going to install this kit over the weekend on my JK 2 door and have 2 quick questions before I start. I’m going to get 35’s sometime next week (probably Mickey Thompson MYZ’s). With the stock 32’s do I need to change the transfer case/pinion angle now or wait until the new skins are installed and, again regarding the 35’s, should I change the caster angle now or wait for the new tires? Terrific write up (and in my case extremely timely)!!

  15. wayoflife August 9th, 2007 11:23 am

    Hey Michigan Mike, I would do everything now in preparation for your new tires. The caster setting won’t be a problem for your 32’s and the pinion angle is more of an issue with lift height and not tire size. And, just so it’s clear, the rotation of it will only help releave stress at the pinion and not at the t-case. I only recommend this step because it can be done with this type of drive shaft and a little help is better than none. Please let mek know if you have any other questions.

    Eddie

  16. CarFanatic August 9th, 2007 2:45 pm

    I will be installing this kit on my 2 door x when it arrives. When you adjust the rear drive shaft angle, this in turn will effect your rear caster angle correct?

  17. CarFanatic August 9th, 2007 2:47 pm

    One more question. The bolt you have to cut to remove, Wont when you go to reinstall it, wont the exhaust still be in the way? Cant you just move the exhaust over enought to pull the bolt out?

  18. wayoflife August 9th, 2007 3:13 pm

    Hi CarFanatic, caster is typically a term used when refering to the angle of your front axle as it can and will effect tracking, steering and overall handling. Your rear axle and its pinion angle will not influence these things.

    Regarding the bolt you have to cut, if you read step #22, the new bolt is reveresed and installed through the outside of your frame rail. :)

    Eddie

  19. Red7 August 10th, 2007 3:35 am

    Hi Eddie, couple a more quick questions:

    I’m not that familiar with hardware so is that “grade 8″ replacement bolt something we can pick up at Home Depot or Ace Hardware or do we have to go to a special hardware shop?

    Also, I got 35×12.50 tires and the 16″ wheels I got have 4.5 BS. Will I likely have no issues with rubbing or am I going to have to adjust something with that back spacing?

    Thanks!

  20. wayoflife August 10th, 2007 3:42 am

    Hey Red7, yes, a grade 8 bolt is the essentially the U.S. equivalent of a metric 10.9 bolt (which is what is on your Jeep now) and can be purchased in the specialty hardware section of your local Lowes, ACE or Truevalue Hardware (section with all the drawers). I rarely find a good selection of grade 8 bolts at Home Depot.

    Regarding your wheels, 6.25″ of back spacing is what comes on your factory wheels and so you should be just fine with 4.5″. I am running 4.75″ now without any problems. :)

    Eddie

  21. Michigan Mike August 10th, 2007 9:04 am

    Am I correct that there aren’t any issues with exchanging the bar-pin end with the sleeve end of the rear shocks (ie boot up) just for the “vanity factor” of having the Full Traction decal more visible? BTW I’m pretty sure that Mickey Thompson doesn’t make MYZ tires. Should have been MTZ’s.

  22. Michigan Mike August 10th, 2007 9:08 am

    Should have mentioned the shocks are the M-Force nitro’s.

  23. Michigan Mike August 10th, 2007 9:14 am

    And 1 final comment before I get started. In the step 6 photo how did you manage to lift your rig from the front diff. case and only get the driver side tire off the ground. I’m gonna go and give that a try! 8-)

  24. wayoflife August 10th, 2007 11:06 am

    Hey Mike,

    Am I correct that there aren’t any issues with exchanging the bar-pin end with the sleeve end of the rear shocks (ie boot up) just for the “vanity factor” of having the Full Traction decal more visible?

    No, you are incorrect in assuming as much. The M-Force shocks are specifically designed to be run with the can side up and need to be for the valving to function properly.

    And 1 final comment before I get started. In the step 6 photo how did you manage to lift your rig from the front diff. case and only get the driver side tire off the ground. I’m gonna go and give that a try!

    Ummm, laws of physics? ;) Seriously, with the diff as far over to the driver side as it is, unless you go way up high, the passenger side tire ain’t going nowhere. :)

    Eddie

  25. Michigan Mike August 11th, 2007 8:45 am

    Well I’m sure glad I asked about the rear shocks before actually doing them. I DID try the front diff. lift…you-da-man (I was never very good at physics)!

  26. Michigan Mike August 11th, 2007 3:56 pm

    Another question. With the 1 1/4″ longer lower control arms do I have to remove both sides lower & upper control arms to get the front axle to move foreward that amount? Man the frame mount bolt for the lowers was incredibly tight. My impact wouldn’t move it and I had to go to a 1/2″ breaker bar with a 20″ piece of pipe hanging off the end. Got it though! I figured this would be a good time to ask the question since my garage temp hit 100 degrees and I quit for the day.

  27. Paul'nVA August 11th, 2007 5:48 pm

    I am seriously considering this lift over all others I have seen to this date. I have a 2007 2 door Rubicon 6 speed. I am planning on running 33’s on the stock wheels w/spacers once the 32’s wear out. My first question is, am I going to need to replace or modify my rear or front drive shafts?
    ( double cardan joint at the X-case end ) or, will I be good to go with the stock Rubicon shafts? I don’t want to void the new life time warranty on the shafts or x-case.

    IF this 3 inch lift will need shaft modifications then I am looking at a 2 - 2.5 inch spring (NOT spacer) lift. Most 2 - 2.5 inch lifts only come with brackets for the front or rear track bars, but not both. Some 2 - 2.5 inch lifts come with front or rear bumpstop extensions, but not both….then there is are sway bar links, possible lower control arm cam bolts and brake line extensions. My second questions are; What components need relocation or adjustment at 2 - 2.5 inches of lift?… What will I need to purchase seperately if I go with Rusty’s 2 inch lift that is just 4 springs and 4 shocks? Who has the most complete 2 -2.5 inch out there if I decide to go with a Kit? Whew, I hope this is understandable! Thanks, Paul’nVA

  28. wayoflife August 13th, 2007 11:30 pm

    Hey Michigan Mike, no, you do not need to remove both uppers and lowers in order to move your axle foward - just the lowers. With them off, you should be able to man-handle it forward. With the uppers off, you should be able to rotate the axle up or down to give you the caster you need.

    Hey Paul’nVA, technically, you will not need a new drive shaft with this lift but a rear double cardin style would be adviseable on a 2-door as it is quite short and the angle that’ll be put on it with 3″ of lift will be extreme and may cause the premature wearing of the CV boots. And, truth be told, I think this may be the case on a 2-door with any lift 2″ or more. Now, regarding 2″ lifts in general, you really don’t need anything more than a set of coil spacers, rear brake line drop brackets, new shocks or shock extensions. Granted, your front and rear axles will shift to one side just a bit if you do not install a track bar relocation bracket in the rear and new adjustable track bar up front but that’s about it. As far as who has the most complete 2″-2.5″ kit goes, I would recommend Full Traction or Rubicon Express for the 2″ and TeraFlex for the 2.5″.

    Eddie

  29. Travis August 15th, 2007 1:27 pm

    Hey, I just wanted to thank u for the excellent instructions. FT needs an overhaul on them. Thanks 2 u I now have a JK X with the ultimate lift and 35’s with painted xenon flat fenders and it looks great! Just need the axle upgrades!

  30. Adam Warren August 19th, 2007 3:03 pm

    These instructions are unbelievably great! I can’t wait to install on my new 07 rubicon. I do have a question, though: What about a new pitman arm? With a 3 inch lift how does your stock pitman arm sit?

  31. wayoflife August 20th, 2007 2:34 am

    Thank you Travis and Adam, I really do appreciate the feedback. Regarding Adam’s question, no new dropped pitman arm is needed with this lift and everything works great.

    Eddie

  32. Michigan Mike August 20th, 2007 1:46 pm

    WOL; Well I finished the install this past Saturday and here are my comments regarding the kit. My vectron bushings for the track bars were too thick by about .125″ and I had to sand them down, as evenly as possible from both sides, with my belt sander to fit them into the frame mounts (I couldn’t think of another way to do it). To get them installed in the bars I turned a can of dust off spray upside down and cooled them quite a bit. A few taps with a rubber mallet and they dropped right in. The M-Force shocks didn’t come with steel sleeves (SLE-104) and the OEM ones won’t fit, to replace the bar-pins pre-installed but Patrick at Full Traction overnighted (although it took 4 days) 2 of them to me. I did realize the front sway discos, that I didn’t use on my Rubi, used the same sleeves so it didn’t hang me up time wise. Xer’s or Sahara’s will need them however. Your adjustment on the rear track bar was right on. My front was off by about .250″ (no big deal to change). At least on my rig the 1/2″x3″ “new” bolt for the curb side front upper really needed to be a 12mm (the 1/2″ wouldn’t fit thru the hole in the frame). Both rear uppers are very close to the tires, maybe 1/2″, but I have spacers when I go to 35’s. 1 final question. Will my stock Rubi 17’s accomodate either Toyo open country M/T 35’s or Mickey Thompson 315/70 MTZ’s? When I took the wheels off the casting in the rear says 17×7.5. Both of these tires need 8.5″ minimum but I thought the OEM wheels were 8.5’s (I couldn’t find that spec anywhere however). An absolutely great write up which, if you go to Full Traction’s web site, they have a link to. You probably saved me 10-12 hours of frustration if I only had the F/T directions. Thanks man! See ya’ll on the trail!

  33. wayoflife August 20th, 2007 4:42 pm

    Hey Michigan Mike, I’m glad to hear you got your lift on and that my write-up was of help to you. Regarding your tires, yes, they will fit your factory wheels so long as you have wheel spacers. The fit will be tight but that can be a good think especially when aired down for the trail.

    Eddie

  34. Red7 August 21st, 2007 12:51 am

    I picked up my ‘08 Sahara on Friday at 9PM, started installing the lift at 11PM and battled through the night until the sun came up at 6AM at which time I made a run to Starbucks for a little pick me up followed by a stop by Lowes to pick up a few things I needed. I went to bed for a bit and then got up and worked until 3Am Sunday morning at which time I was pretty much finished. This was my first lift install and it took me a long time but many of things I battled I could do over in half the time. Anyone who is nervous about doing this on their own I encourage you to go for it as long as you have the time. I’m in pain, my hands are a little beat up, I threw a couple of things and dropped about 500 F-bombs but in the end I actually enjoyed it, learned a ton about my Jeep and feel fulfilled that I did the work myself. Now to the comments and questions:

    I ran into some similar issues as Michigan Mike. I didn’t have any issues with my track bars but several of the control arm ends were a really tight fit into the stock brackets so I had to beat the hell out of them to get them in which was probably not the best thing for them but I tried prying the brackets open more but only pounding on them got them in. I went through 3 sawzall blades cutting that really tough bolt and as MM said the 1/2″ bolt was a really, really tight fit. I couldn’t bang it through but I was able to thread it through but it a long time and I actually needed a breaker bar at times to turn it through the sleeve and get it out the other end. Will that be an issue if the bolt is in there so tight that it will bind inside the sleeve when the control arm moves up or down?My rear track bar was off by 1/4″ so the axle is shifted over to the passenger side but I’m going to adjust that tonight. I think my M-force came with the metal sleeves but now MM has me doubting so I better check.

    The M-force shocks seem really stiff compared to stock. Leaving the dealer I thought, man this thing rides so nice on the street but I’ve been disappointed with the M-force (at least initially) as the Jeep now rides like the one I had in college 10 years ago. Will these soften up some? It’s not stiff like a sports car suspension (obviously, it’s a Jeep after all) that stays glued to the road, the problem I have with it is the compression is too stiff and the rebound is too fast so every bump I hit in the road it feels like the wheel is chattering/bouncing rather than sucking up the bump while staying planted. It reminds me of how I have my Supercross suspension setup for sucking up 90′ triples but skips/bounces around over the small bumps/washboard where as my Motocross bike would bottom out over the big jumps since it’s softer but it sucks up all of those little chatter bumps like they aren’t even there. This is getting long so I’ll shut up about the shocks but please tell me these are going to soften up or these will be going on ebay as soon as some other options come on the market.

    My caster angle ended up being 9 degrees on the passenger side and 8 on the driver side. Is that ok or do I need to adjust it to 7?

    Also, my control arms had 3 zerk fitting on each side in the back and then just 1 on each side in the front for a total of 8. Do I need to do anything to the other joints on the control arms or track bars? Is there a way of smearing in some white lithium grease or is that not necessary?

    All in all I’m very happy with the quality of this kit and I know I’d still be working on it if I didn’t have this great write up and photos on my laptop underneath the Jeep with me. I really appreciate it Eddie! I got a little more than 4″ out of the lift right now but I’m sure it will settle a little especially if I get new bumpers but I’m glad for the additional lift as I wanted a 4″ any way.

  35. wayoflife August 21st, 2007 1:44 am

    Hey Red7, I’m glad to hear my write-up was able to help you out.

    Regarding your questions about the M-Force shocks, for sure they will be stiffer than the Sahara or X shocks as they are a monotube nitro shock but not so much to the point where they should cause chatter. Just to make sure, you did install them can side up right? Because their valving is specifically designed to work this way and inverting them would cause them to not function properly.

    As far as your bushings go, using a bench vice might of helped getting them in easier and maybe I should have included that in my write-up. As far as your track bars go, so long as you got the frame mount bushings lubed up good with white lithium grease, they should be good to go for a long time. I have about 9,000 miles on mine and they are still quiet. If you drive through a lot of water, you may need to take them apart from time to time and apply more grease but I still think you could go for a long time without it. Also, you should be good to go with +8° ~ +9° of caster, should drive nice and straight.

    Eddie

  36. Red7 August 21st, 2007 4:13 am

    Thanks for the response Eddie! I must have used the wrong terminology because I didn’t have any problems getting the bushings or collars in. What I did have an issue with is getting a few of the control arms to go into the bracket on the axle. It was like the bracket was pinched a little so the rod ends with their misalignment spacers were just a hair to wide so I really had to pound on them to get them in the bracket and then getting them to move forward or back was tough since they were so tight. I don’t think this was an issue of poor fabrication on Full Traction’s part as much as Jeep just having made these a tight fit.

    I did install the M-force cans up. I’m trying to rack up some miles to break in the engine before our trip back to Mexico so I just took it out for a 50 mile drive and what I’m noticing is it rides smoother over bumps at highway speeds so it’s really the around town slower bumps that are a little annoying such as going over a man hole cover or a small pot hole at 20 mph. I guess my Supercross example holds true because I remember the first time I had my suspension setup for SX racing and I thought it was so stiff but the faster and more aggressively I rode the smoother it was. Sounds like the nitro shocks are the same so I’m just going to have to speed more around town. :-)

    I noticed that my Jeep has a very slight pull to the right and I didn’t really drive it enough stock to realize if it did this before the lift. Is there an adjustment I can make? Should I take it in and have an alignment done or just leave it since it’s subtle?

    Also, just to clarify, was I supposed to do anything to lube the rod ends of the control arms and track bars or the upper front control arms assembly joint?

    Thanks again!

  37. wayoflife August 21st, 2007 10:32 am

    Ah-ha! Yes, in some cases, getting new control arms of any make can be difficult to get into the factory mounts. What I would have recommended is to take a pry bar and spread the mount apart just a bit as it would have made your job a lot easier.

    Regarding your slight pull to the right, there are a few things to check/consider. First, streets are typically made with a “crown” in them for drainage purposes and a slight pull is normal in that direction. However, if you have tested your Jeep on absolute level ground and it still has it, check your tire pressure to make sure they are even. Also, am I reading correctly that you have more caster on your passenger side and you’re absolutely sure of it? They should be virtually the same and that might be causing your pull.

    As far as lubing the rod ends go, it is not necessary as they are not designed for lubrication.

    Eddie

  38. Red7 August 21st, 2007 9:39 pm

    Thanks Eddie! I just got back from a 200 mile drive up in the mountains to get out of the Phoenix heat and put a few miles on the new vehicle. It is still pulling but as I said it is very slight and yes the crown on some roads made it more noticeable and on flat ground it will hold a line for a little bit before always defaulting to the right. It’s not much so I’m not worried but will check the tire pressure and recheck the caster not that I have some miles on it.

    I noticed something new today and I’m all but sure I haven’t experienced it before. There is a vibration that I just noticed today and it caught me off guard because I took the Jeep out for a 50 mile drive on the highway last night and I swear it wasn’t there. Today while driving out of town I almost immediately noticed this vibration and it is most pronounced around 55 mph and fades away a little once above 60 or below 45 but it is still there. I was scared I had forgot to tighten the lug nuts after putting the wheels back on so I check them and they were fine. I looked at the drive shafts and am not sure what to look for but nothing seemed strange. It was 110 today so I didn’t crawl under the car as just touching the ground with my knee to look under burned but I can check it out in the garage tonight if you let me know what to look for. Maybe it’s something in the motor but it didn’t change at all throughout the 200+ trip today. BTW-I filled her up for the first time and got 390 out of the first tank. I wanted to break 400 but I was on fumes and had my 3 year old in the car and it was 110 out. Calculating the little bit I still had in the tank would have gotten me over 400 mpg and 100% of that driving was with the AC on. Of course I’ve been babying it since I’m breaking it in.

  39. wayoflife August 21st, 2007 9:44 pm

    Hey Red7, a speed related vibration as you have described is almost always a tire balancing issue especially when throwing a weight isn’t such a hard thing to do under any circumstances.

    Eddie

  40. Red7 August 24th, 2007 1:59 am

    I finished up my install last night by putting my 35’s on and they fit great with the 4.5″ BS. Plenty of room all around and it looks incredible. The vibration is there and seems to be even more pronounced to where the stearing wheel wiggles back and forth really quickly about a 1/4″ but I’m wondering if that doesn’t have to do with the more aggressive tread on my Procomp Xterrains. The more I drove it today the less I noticed it so it could be the tires or maybe rebalancing them will help. I love these tires by the way as they are quiet and didn’t effect my mpg much. My Jeep seems to be doing pretty good even with 3.73 gearing. The Jeep also holds a line better with the larger tires so it’s really not pulling to the right any more. The M-Force shocks are still a little stiff for my taste especially at slower speeds on rough roads. After driving a few miles down a road with lots of cracks in the asphalt my wife nervously asked if Jeeps were supposed to be that rough as we were really getting jossled around. I’m going to head to Sedona this weekend to go offroading for the first time so we’ll see if they make up for it on the trails.

  41. javier August 24th, 2007 2:40 am

    Hi!! I installed this week a 3″ fulltraction lift system on my rubi 2dr, works great.

    I have 33×12.50 tires but the only problem is the shummy steering drive feeling.

    how can I fix it?

    best regards….

  42. wayoflife August 24th, 2007 11:26 am

    Hey Red7,

    The vibration is there and seems to be even more pronounced to where the stearing wheel wiggles back and forth really quickly about a 1/4″ but I’m wondering if that doesn’t have to do with the more aggressive tread on my Procomp Xterrains.

    What you are describing definitely sounds like your tires aren’t balanced properly. Even if these are new tires, this would not be uncommon as balancing large M/T’s is difficult to do and can take more than one try to get right.

    As far as your ride being rough goes, I honestly don’t know what to tell you especially when I fell my ride is better than what I had with the factory Rubicon shocks which I felt were on the stiff side. I can tell you though that the factory Sahara and X shocks are a lot softer and so perhaps by comparison, the M-Force seem stiff for you.

    Eddie

  43. wayoflife August 24th, 2007 11:27 am

    Hi javier,

    I have 33×12.50 tires but the only problem is the shummy steering drive feeling.

    I’m sorry but I’m not sure I understand what you are asking. Could you explain yourself a bit more here?

    Eddie

  44. Ken Jong Il August 29th, 2007 10:36 pm

    Hey Eddie! What kind of articulation benefits would I get from this kit if I ran 33’s instead of 35’s? As sexy as a 4″ long arm would be, I’m not a big fan of how monsterous JK’s look with a 4″ suspension, so this Full Traction lift seems pretty choice and comes highly recommended. Would this be able to tackle pretty much anything I throw at it if I ran 33’s instead of 35’s?

  45. wayoflife August 30th, 2007 2:11 am

    Hey Ken, I don’t know if you would get any articulation benefits from running 33’s but they do work quite well and yes, they will be able to do most anything that 35’s can do. Click on this link to see shots of a 4-door Rubicon that has this lift and 33’s - it’s the white one with the doors on:

    http://www.project-jk.com/wp-gallery2.php?g2_itemId=29605

    Eddie

  46. Ken Jong Il August 31st, 2007 11:17 pm

    What kind of hang-ups did you run into with this lift while on the trails?

  47. wayoflife September 5th, 2007 10:27 am

    Hang-ups? Honestly, I have been doing runs no less than 2 times a month since installing it and have punished it on some of the hardest terrain I could test it on and I have had no hang-ups to speak of. :)

    Eddie

  48. carfanatic September 16th, 2007 10:48 pm

    Those adjustments you made to the arms,and mesurments you listed to set them too, will that fix the pinion angle?? Or will you have to re adjust to get the angles right?

  49. wayoflife September 17th, 2007 10:39 am

    The measurements I listed for up front will only address your caster angle and they were only what worked for me. Your Jeep may be different +/- a bit. In the rear, the measurements listed are just approximate points to start at to have your pinion rotated up on a 4-door. Again, your Jeep may be different and if you have a 2-door, it will be different for sure.

    Eddie

  50. CarFanatic September 20th, 2007 10:18 am

    Ya mine is a two door… Guess I’ll get it close then hope for the alignement to fix the rest.

  51. wayoflife September 20th, 2007 10:27 am

    Just so you know, your toe-in will not have changed due to the new steering design that the JK has and if you re-center your steering wheel yourself, the only thing you will be paying to have done at an alignment shop is getting your caster set. Need I say, save your money and do this yourself. :)

    Eddie

  52. carfanatic September 22nd, 2007 12:56 am

    ok, when adjust the pinion and caster.. I only adjust the upper control arms??? I dont need to adjust the lower arms?? I have a 2 door, so Should I leave the lower arms at the measurements you suggested? What should I be looking for to know if I need to adjust the lower control arm length?

  53. wayoflife September 22nd, 2007 12:11 pm

    Yes, your adjustable lower control arms are designed to let you reposition your axle under your Jeep and the uppers are designed to change the angle they sit at. In the rear, if your track bar is making contact with your coils, it has been pushed back too far and you will need to adjust your lower control arms to be shorter. If in the front, you coils are making contact with the bump stop towers, your front axle most likely needs to be pushed forward and your lower control arms will allow you to do that. However, I should point out that if you have too much caster, your front coils may curve a bit and this could cause them to contact your bump stop towers as well so be mindful of that. :)

    Eddie

  54. carfanatic September 23rd, 2007 8:49 pm

    ok thanks. I assume the 2 and 4 door front set ups are the same? So the measurments that you mentioned should work fine right? The rear I’m guessing the there a bit different, then again the could be the same, that would make sense from an engineering stand point. So Will the rear mesurments you stated to start out with work for a 2 door? I’m doing this install next weekend. I guess I’m wanting to get set lengths to start at. I dont want to not drive properly.

  55. wayoflife September 24th, 2007 1:38 pm

    Yes, the measurements should be relatively the same. Granted, every Jeep seems to be a bit different and you should check your Jeep after the installation of your kit.

    Eddie

  56. rampage October 13th, 2007 12:59 am

    Eddie,

    You did great job to do the document with along instruction. I wonder if you can provide me the PDF since of this since it use up a lot of papers. WHen I print this one and it will come out many pages with along comments.

    Thanks,
    Mark

  57. wayoflife October 17th, 2007 7:56 pm

    Hi Mark, I really do apologize but I do not have this write-up available as a PDF at this time. Sorry.

    Eddie

  58. chad October 31st, 2007 2:10 pm

    are there any drive line mods you have to do when installing the 3″ lift I want to run 35s but dont want the headaches of changing the drive line

    Thanks

  59. wayoflife November 5th, 2007 5:18 pm

    Hi Chad, I apologize for not responding to you sooner. I had been in Las Vegas attending the SEMA show all last week and just got back in late last night. Regarding your question, if you have a 2-door, you will want to change out your rear drive line to a double cardin u-joint style shaft. And, if you have an automatic, you might want to consider replacing that as well on 2-door or unlimited models as well as the factory shaft will come into contact with the auto skid plate. Your other option would be to remove the auto skit.

    Eddie

  60. TanktheTwat December 13th, 2007 11:16 pm

    Way Of Life,

    Is there anyway that i can contact you personally to discuss somehtings with you. I’m only 15 but just received a 2008 Wrangler JK Unlimited X and i’m oblivious to most things concerning off-roading and technical terminology. If you could just please inform me on the basics about the sport, and then I will teach myself from there.

    Thanks for listening,

    Scott

  61. wayoflife December 14th, 2007 11:35 am

    Just sent you an email.

    Eddie

  62. alaskabound February 26th, 2008 1:06 am

    i have a 4 dr rubicon on order 08…looking to install the ft 3″ lift when it gets here. i recently have read of problems with the esp on lifted 07 models….do you know if this has been addressed?

  63. wayoflife February 26th, 2008 12:06 pm

    So long as you have your steering wheel centered, you shouldn’t have any ESP problems and any that you might have will eventually go away as your ESP learns what’s going on. But, you can also have your ESP turned off.

    Eddie

  64. cliff April 10th, 2008 7:49 pm

    I just finished installing a FT Premium 3″ lift kit and used your great instructions as a guide. Only issue, I had to disable my ESP. Is that normal?

  65. wayoflife April 11th, 2008 1:03 am

    While your ESP going off after a lift is somewhat common, most of the time, it is caused by a steering wheel being of center or running too much air in your tires. either way, the ESP system is progressive and will learn. In otherwords, it will eventually figure things out and not trigger all the time.

  66. SuperDave April 11th, 2008 2:44 pm

    Eddie-do you know how tall your JK is with the lift and bigger tires? Can you still park it in the garage?

  67. RCubed April 15th, 2008 2:35 pm

    Eddie,

    I just completed this install. THANK you so much for the great instructions. Some quick comments while I have them fresh in my head.
    On my 2008 Sahara Unlimited there were not any wires attached to the front upper control arm.
    For the rear install at step 62 you say to go to step 66 if you have a 4 door. That should be go to step 65. It was a bugger getting those rear upper control arms on after I had put just about everything else on.

    Thats it for now. I have some other notes I can pass along if you are interested. I am a technology guy that is sort of mechanically inclined but I have never done anything like this to any vehicle I have owned in the past 23 years. Before this I couldn’t have pointed out a control arm from a sway bar link from a track bar without it being a total guess. As such I have some mental notes on things I “guessed” at during the installation process that may help those with this particular install and similar ones in the future.

    Thanks again for this write up.

    Cheers
    Ron

  68. wayoflife April 16th, 2008 2:46 pm

    Yeah, I suppose the wires are only for a Rubicon or a JK fitted with a locker. Thanks for pointing that out.

  69. wayoflife April 16th, 2008 4:02 pm

    Hi SuperDave, my JK sits at about 6′-11″ at its highest point with the soft top on and at this highest point, it just rubs the base of my garage door.

    Eddie

  70. Rick April 18th, 2008 11:20 pm

    HELP!!I have a 2008 JK Rubicon Unlimited and had the Full Traction Ultimate 3 inch suspension system installed along with the shocks. I have driven it approx 1000 miles and it has developed a clanking noise. I have had everything re torqued and it seems to come right back?? The shop that installed it has been doing suspension lifts for over 10 years, this was the first Full Traction. I’m going back to their shop to discuss the problem in the morning…any suggestions?? The loud clanking/snapping noise seems to come if I back up then go forward there is a LOUD CLANK also if I go over a speed bump in a parking lot slowly when the front wheels go up over the bump there is no clank only when the wheels go back down to the pavement.I’m very frustrated and ready to sell the JK if I cant fix it!

  71. wayoflife April 20th, 2008 12:40 pm

    A loud ‘clank’ is typically caused by something like a coil catching on something and letting go. Have you checked to see if your passenger side rear coils isn’t making contact with the track bar bolt? Or, have you checked to see if maybe your passenger side front coil is catching on the bumpstop tower?

  72. Mr. Girou May 20th, 2008 1:43 pm

    I bought a Rubicon RE7200 Series TJ Extreme Duty Long Arm System and I am having touble with it. Can anyone help me on this? I installed it but getting alot of Vibration. Don’t know what to do. Called the company and they tell me to just adjust it.
    If you can help I would be very happy. I am in the millitary station in Bahrain.

    Thank you
    Mr. Dragon

  73. wayoflife May 21st, 2008 9:23 am

    are you sure that your vibes aren’t being caused by your tires being out of balance? also, if you installed a new aftermarket front drive shaft, have you tried reducing the amount of caster you have?

    eddie

  74. mal May 28th, 2008 5:36 am

    hi there Eddie,
    I installed the 3″ Ultimate kit all good except for the Front track bar. it dosnt line up Angularly to the Axel and Frame mounts, i had to push quite a bit of presure on the arm to get it to slot in, so its now fitted under tension. i feel this is due to the bushing used, it doesnt allow for any miss Alignment (oddly enough the original factory Track Bar fits better although shorter) I can shorten the lower control arms to bring the axel back and make it line better but it’s still not right, I feel the bushing will wear prematurely, ANY IDEAS?

    Also I read that you advised ‘Chad’ that he needed to change he’s rear drive line because he has a Shorty with 35” tires, I have the same but I haven’t heard that you need to change any drivelines before? I have no issues with my rig, should I? What are the problems that occur with Std Drivelines?

    Be great to hear from you,
    Mal.

  75. wayoflife May 28th, 2008 10:36 am

    mal, how much longer did you make your lower control arms and how much shorter did you make your uppers? also, after changing the position and caster of your axle, getting your track bar into the axle mount will require some effort but you should not have any issues with the bushing wearing out prematurely. at least, i haven’t had any issues and i have well over 30,000 miles on mine.

    regarding your rear drive shaft, it being as short as it is will cause your CV boots to be in a constant state of pinch. over time, this will cause them to wear out prematurely and tear. once compromises, water and dirt can get in and ruin your joints. this will not happen immediately but it will happen - i have seen it on numerous JK’s already.

    eddie

  76. mal May 28th, 2008 9:55 pm

    ok the Front upper control Arms are to your spec i.e. A 5/8″ Gap giving 1/8″ Longer than Stock. The lowers you said to make the Gap 1 1/4″ but i made it 1″ as a starting point so it can still go shorter as it should now be at 1/2″ longer than stock and you ended up with only 3/8″.
    Castor angle is L/H 7 1/2 Deg & R/H 5 1/2 Deg. I also have issue with the drivers side Coil spring curving fwd and rubbing on the Sway bar arm! the gap between the pasenger side coil to swaybar is larger its not rubbing but appears to be curving rearwards?

    with regard to the CV’s I’d have to change both at the Transfer case wouldnt i? as the angle of the front drive line is at a sharper angle.

    Mal.

    p.s. one more thing while ive got ya;)- having Dana44 Rear & Dana30 in the front (i have the Manual, Auto’s have 35s’) will that Diff be able to take the 35″ Tires ok? i have 4.56 ratios with detroit 3/4 locker front, Full Locker Rear. have you known anyone to have issues with them? should i look at upgrading to a 44?

  77. wayoflife May 29th, 2008 2:44 pm

    hi mal, i had made changes to this write-up about a week ago and have included new pics and specific measurements regarding the control arms. you might want to double check your measurements of them by doing an eye to eye measurement just in case. also, have you check to make sure that you have your axle centered? regarding driveshafts, you’ll have to replace the entire shafts. as far as your axles go, yes, they will be able to run 35’s just fine and know plenty of people who have that setup now.

    eddie

  78. David June 9th, 2008 11:28 am

    Apparently I have the same problem as Rick. I install the FT 3” lift on my 2008 JK 4-door and the front coils have a curve in them. The passenger side coil is curved towards the back and is rubbing on the bump stop tower. The driver side coil is curved towards the front and is very close to the sway bar. The bottom of the coil is seated correctly in the slot of the seat therefore I don’t think I should turn the coil. I had my local alignment shop take a look at it and they tried switching the front coils but the effect was the same. Is there a seating pad at the top of the coil that may require rotating or could there be a problem with the springs? Any suggestions would be greatly appreciated.

    Thanks,
    David

  79. wayoflife June 10th, 2008 9:42 am

    who did you buy your lift from? could be that you got a set of coils that were cut wrong. i would contact your sales rep to let them know of your problem and see if they can help you out.

  80. -MAW- July 1st, 2008 7:20 pm

    HEY WOL,

    DO YOU RUB AT FULL STUFF W/T THE FT 3″ ULTIMATE ?

  81. wayoflife July 2nd, 2008 3:12 am

    i did a bit at a full stuff and turning but only after installing a heavy front bumper and powerplant. i installed a 1″ body lift and the problem went away.

  82. -maw- July 2nd, 2008 8:07 am

    ok then , so fender flare triming is needed then or do the b/l
    thanks

  83. leros July 14th, 2008 3:39 pm

    Hi Way of Life,

    Do the sway bar discos on this lift have a pin set up to store them out of the way(like the teraflex disco)or do they need to be bungeed?

  84. wayoflife July 15th, 2008 2:45 am

    the links come completely off but the sway bar arm will need to be bungied or strapped up somehow. personally, i would recommend picking up a set of teraflex discos.

  85. enrapture6 February 4th, 2009 11:13 pm

    I am looking to lift my 2 door automatic x model. I have couple of questions to start with. #1. I have read in the above comments that since I have a 2 door automatic, I will need to replace my driveshafts? If so, could you suggest a front and rear drive shaft (manufacture)? Also suggest where I could obtain them (online retailer)? #2 In regards to the post install and the affects on the speedo, could I get a dealer to re-program the speedo instead of obtaining the aftermarket program-er myself? Let me know. Thanks.

  86. wayoflife February 5th, 2009 10:28 am

    1. you really can’t go wrong with a coast or je reel shaft and you can get either from http://www.northridge4×4.com.

    2. if you go taller than a 32″ tire, no, your dealer will not be able to help you out and you will need to get a programmer like hypertech makes in order to recalibrate it.

  87. enrapture6 February 5th, 2009 10:16 pm

    Thanks for the info.

    Is there anyway to lift a 2 door jk without replacing the driveshafts? I read in your old man emu wirte up comments that even with the 2 inch lift, the driveshafts will have to be replaced. Sucks becasue the cost spikes once you consider the price of a decent lift, driveshafts, wheels, and tires. I estimate around $3000. Ouchy.

  88. wayoflife February 6th, 2009 2:48 am

    sure, if you have a 6-speed, you don’t need to replace the front shaft. however, at 3″ or more, the rear will have to be addressed sooner than later. if you want to stick with your factory shafts, you should get a 2.5″ coil spacer lift. that will keep you in the safe zone.

  89. enrapture6 February 6th, 2009 12:04 pm

    i c… so you are saying that with a 2.5 inch coil spacer lift, no replacement of driveshafts is needed? even on an auotmatic 2 door? if so, then why wont the old man emu 2 inch work with out driveshaft replacements? i realize the old man emu lifts with springs and shocks, and the budget boost lifts with shocks and spacers. still, isnt the driveshaft replacement lift height dependent? if so, what is the cut-off height? sorry to be a pain, but i am trying to figure things out. thanks again for your help.

  90. wayoflife February 6th, 2009 12:09 pm

    for the rear at 3″ of lift or more, the angle of your rear drive shaft on a 2-door (which is very short) will be at too steep of an angle and this will cause your CV boots to wear out very quickly. needless to say, in the rear, this is height dependent. up front, the drive shaft is very long and even at 3″ or more, it will still sit at a shallow enough angle that your CV boots will not get compromised. however, with longer shocks, your axle will be able to droop a lot more and when this happens, your drive shaft will swipe into the tranny pan and this is what will tear the spline shaft boot. does this make sense?

  91. enrapture6 February 6th, 2009 3:41 pm

    makes total sense. thanks. so is there any suspension lift (springs and shocks) that can be used on a 2 door jk without replacing the driveshafts?

  92. wayoflife February 6th, 2009 6:48 pm

    the OME medium duty coil spring setup will give you about 2″ of lift exactly. also, the shocks they use are about stock lenght and so you will not get too much droop.

  93. JIM March 26th, 2009 10:40 pm

    I JUST HAD A FULL TRACTION ULTIMATE 4 INCH LIFT PUT ON MY 08 JK 2 DOOR SIX SPEED WITH 37 INCH IROKS.ALL I CAN SAY IS WOW AND WOW AGAIN.IT LOOKS SO AWSOME.ONLY PROBLEM WAS IS THAT YOU NEED LONGER BREAK LINES THEY ARE NOT INCLUDED BUT OTHER WISE ITS AWSOME.

  94. dave May 30th, 2009 5:23 pm

    My 2 door upper rear control arms measure 17-7/16″ center to center and in this write up you say:

    57.Your Jeep JK Wrangler’s factory rear upper control arms measure 17-11/16″ in length center to center. As a starting point, I set my new Full Traction adjustable rear upper control arms to being 17-13/16″ long which is 1/8″ longer than stock.

    What the deal? I got wierd OEM arms or you got a mis-print?

  95. greg August 24th, 2009 6:14 am

    just finnished installing this kit on a RHD JK 4 DOOR CRD here in Australia, The kit works perfectly well but here are a few problems i ran in to for any ozzzys that want to get the kit. The eye on the front shocks i got with the kit were too small to accept the bushes and sleves off the original shocks, no problem though just got new bushes from a local pedders store that suited. Also the front trac bar supplied with the kit is 30mm too long and had to be cut, the shape is good and doesnt hit the pumpkin. I also found the measurements of the control arms in the write up didnt apply and the bolt which you suggested to cut came out (not easy but with a little manipulating it came out). In regards to the write up though I am very greatful and it made the job much easier. Thank you so much for taking the time to go into so much detail

  96. Waiting August 30th, 2009 10:31 pm

    Dave and/or WOL,
    Are the measurements off because the write-up was done on a 4 door and Dave’s JK is a 2 door?

  97. wayoflife August 31st, 2009 12:14 am

    the front end should be the same on both but on a 2-door, the rear uppers will be quite different.

  98. Rick September 21st, 2009 10:50 pm

    Eddie,
    I was considering purchasing this lift but I have seen very negative feedback about the squeaking. Have you or anyone else found this to be an issue? This would completely drive me nuts.

    Looks like you have ran both FT and Teraflex. Would you pick one over the other?

    Thanks!
    Rick

  99. wayoflife September 22nd, 2009 1:59 am

    so long as you maintain the bushings with a high quality grease, they will stay quite. what they offer over rubber bushings is a significant amount of bind free flex. having said that, i know that FT will be offering up rubber bushings as well.

  100. EstianSwanepoel October 18th, 2009 7:14 am

    Hey Eddie

    Nice set of shoes on there!
    Which wheels are those and what tires are on them?
    Dimensions?
    Think this is the lift I’m gonna bring in to South Africa, so I won’t have to ask you zillions of questions on JK-Forum and Facebook anymore ;)

    Appreciate all the advice :)

    Estian

  101. wayoflife October 19th, 2009 12:17 am

    those are 17″ pro comp 8179 Black Wheels

  102. Mike June 27th, 2010 12:56 pm

    Hey, I was wondering if you had any squeaking issues coming from the 3″ full-traction ultimate lift kit? Ive read about other people having those issues with theirs. I have a 2010 Unlimited Rubicon and wanted to do the 4″ ultimate but was having second thought due to those reviews. Help Please!

  103. Mike June 27th, 2010 1:02 pm

    Ok, I just read another post a couple up from mine. What kind of bushings would make the squeaking noise? With the rubber bushings, would those wear out quick? How come the factory bushings don’t squeak?

  104. wayoflife June 27th, 2010 3:52 pm

    the squeaking comes from the polyurethane bushings going dry. keep them greased and they shouldn’t squeak. unfortunately, you do have to do this often but, they do offer a substantial amount of bind free flex. the factory bushing are bonded rubber and twist as opposed to rotating. this is why they do not need maintenance and do not squeak. they last a long time too but, bind up when flexing. having said that, you can still get a lot of flex out of them and full traction is now offering them in place of the poly bushings. if squeaking and maintenance is an issue for you, ask for them instead.

  105. Mike June 27th, 2010 5:32 pm

    Thanks for the quick and informative reply! Being in the military takes a lot of my time so I think the bonded rubber bushings might be my happy medium. As soon as I get home from this deployment in Afghanistan I can start on the project. One more thing, it will be a daily driver so what shocks would you recommend to keep the ride nice?

  106. wayoflife June 27th, 2010 11:51 pm

    The Bilstein’s FT sells with their kit are really nice and I might go with them.

  107. Mike June 28th, 2010 3:20 pm

    Ok awsome! One more thing, would the 4″ ultimate lift kit with the rubber bushings have more articulation and flex than the factory Rubicon suspension?

  108. wayoflife June 28th, 2010 3:25 pm

    yes

  109. Adrian August 4th, 2013 8:38 pm

    I understand that stock driveshafts will work up to a 3″ lift with the stock control arms, but does that apply to a 2.5″ or 3″ kit like this that replaces all 8 control arms?

    Thanks, and hello from Canada!

  110. wayoflife August 7th, 2013 12:06 pm

    The control arms have nothing to do with what will work. The length of your shocks do. Anything longer than a stock shock with an extension will be too long and you front drive shaft will come into contact with an automatic transmission sump pan.

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